Harry Brown of Fargo, a 4-year-old boy is supposed to have walked into an airhole on the ice of the river and perished. His companion, a boy of about the same age, told his mother that "Harry walked into the hole in the ice and didn't come up any more." Dynamite was used but at last reports wthout {sp} result.

Valley City Times-Record, 12/19/1912
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Badly Crushed.

Harry Fergueson who had his leg badly crushed and broken Tuesday is at the city hospital. He was on his way to Fred Smith's place 18 miles southwest when the accident occurred. When about 10 miles out he decided to get on the wagon which was loaded with lumber and ride for a while as he had been walking to keep warm. In climbing on the wagon he slipped and the wheel of the wagon passed over his leg below the knee, crushing and breaking it. He was quickly conveyed to the city hospital as quickly as possible.

Jamestown Weekly Alert, 12/5/1901
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George Bacon and George Monahan had a disagreement up in Nelson county, Bacon licked Monahan, and the latter got a shotgun and planted a few shot in the skin of the other man. Bacon was fined $10 and Monahan was held to the district court.

Bismarck Tribune, 11/12/1897
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Bill Bailey Insane.

Bill Bailey, a Tagus farmer, was arrested Saturday by Deputy Sheriff Dick Steinhofer and brot {sp} to the county jail. Bailey is undoubtedly insane. He has terrorized several of the residents of the Tagus country by entering their homes. He imagines that he owns the entire country.

Ward County Independent, 11/26/1908
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DISTRESSINGLY SAD.

A Woman and Child Burned to Death in A Prairie Fire.

One of the most distressingly sad cases of death that ever occurred in this section is that of Mrs. Schroeder and little child who perished in a prairie fire about twenty miles north of this city Tuesday afternoon. The family are well known in town having lived on Second Avenue north for a year or more in a comfortable house which they still own and into which they intended soon to move for the winter so that the children could attend school.

The particulars of the sad affair are as follows, as related to us by the eldest son, a young man about 21 years of age: He and his father, Carl Schroeder, were about four miles from home threshing, they owning and running a thresher, when the fire was discovered coming towards their house and wheat stacks. The father told the young man to take a horse and ride over home and see to guarding the stacks against the fire. When he arrived the fire was very near to the stacks and he found his mother and four children out beating back the flames. The heat was so intense that the young man told his mother and the smaller children to go to another point where the heat was not so great. This they did but were soon compelled to seek refuge from the flames. One boy succeeded in reaching the plowed ground, two of the other children, a girl and boy, ran into a pond of water near by and by ducking themselves in the water counteracted the heat and prevented their clothing from taking fire. The mother with the youngest child, about three years old, succeeded in getting behind the fire on the ground just burned over, but were strangled by the dense smoke that arose from the smoldering ashes, fell exhausted and perished, the child in its mothers arms, their clothing taking fire and burning on their bodies.

The bodies of the unfortunate victims were brought into the city yesterday evening to their former place of residence on Second Avenue from which the sad funeral will take place this afternoon and burial at Highland Home cemetery. Mrs. Schoeder's age was about 42 years. The children that escaped with their lives are more or less scorched but not dangerously injured.

The fire, after burning Mr. Schroeder's wheat and oats stacks swept along toward where they were threshing, consuming the thresher and wheat, the horses and mules to the horse power being saved by being cut loose and turned out to take care of themselves. Mr. Schoeder's {sp} house escaped destruction.

Jamestown Weekly Alert, 10/23/1884
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Ole Magnuson who resides north of Wimbledon, was hooked in the head by a cow and it took fourteen stitches to draw the wound together.

Jamestown Weekly Alert, 12/5/1901
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GUNMEN HOLD UP 2 IN MINOT

Minot, N. D., Nov. 11—Two holdups were perpetrated by gunmen in Minot early last night.

John Scheuer, 67, Minot butcher, is in a local hospital today, suffering from severe wounds about the head and face, sustained when he grappled with his assailant, wrenching the gun out of his hand.

John Franzona, was arrested a short time later by a policeman when it was noticed his face bore evidence of fresh wounds. When authorities searched his room in a local hotel they found a revolver and bloody clothing.

Bismarck Tribune, 11/11/1922
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James Hyde, cashier of a New Rockford bank, was seriously burned about the head and shoulders by the explosion of a gasoline lamp which exploded directly over him. Mrs. Hyde who was near was slightly burned. The couple were checking up money when the accident occurred. About $300 were burned and $700 damaged, but this will be redeemed.

Ward County Independent, 11/1/1906
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Fatally Wounded Her Husband.

Butte, Mont., Special.—Mrs. James Baptiste shot and fatally wounded her husband, a telegraph operator at the M. & M. pool rooms, where he was employed. Baptiste recently left his wife and took up with a variety actress. Mrs. Baptiste brought suit for divorce, but was not satisfied to let the recreant husband off so easily. She walked into the pool rooms and, pointing the revolver through a window at her husband, blazed away. The ball passed through his body and struck the backbone. She was arrested.

Pembina Pioneer Express, 9/24/1897
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