Took Rope Route

Litchville, N.D., Feb. 6.—Otto N. Johnson, 40, a farmer, killed himself by hanging at his farm near here. Financial troubles drove his {sp} insane it is believed. He undertook last fall to feed a carload of cattle for a St. Paul firm, and heavy losses resulted. He was not married.

Williston Graphic, 2/7/1918
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In Missoula the other day, a Chinaman died and was buried by his countrymen in their usual style. A small bunch, consisting of roast chicken, pork, and three or four apples, together with a bowl of rice and a pair of chop sticks, were placed at the head of the grave. There are various opinions as to whom this repast it for. One is that when the devil comes for this poor Celestial he would eat it and go away happy. After burning some greasy, sky-rocket-like candles, and rubbing some of the grease on the headboard the mourners struck out for tow, and the funeral was over.

Bismarck Tribune, 1/26/1883
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Fell Thirty-Five Feet.

Fargo.—To fall 35 feet from the top of a telephone pole to the hard sidewalk and escape with only a fractured leg is the record made by George F. Selvege of this city.

Selvege is an employee of the Northwestern Telephone company and was working at some repair job on the top of a pole at Seventh avenue south. In some unaccountable manner he slipped and fell 35 feet to the ground.

An examination as to his condition after the fall revealed the fact that his right leg was fractured in two places and he was immediately given medical attention.

Turtle Mountain Star, 1/12/1911
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The man Smith at Valley City, whose supposed suicide was published in the Alert three days ago, is generally believed to have decamped the country instead of remaining to answer for selling mortgaged property and mortgaging sold property. The idea of his being in the Sheyenne is now regarded as decidedly fishy.


The Daily Times of Valley City, in speaking of the late dissappearance of one Smith from the scenes of that place says that he willfully swindled at least five or six creditors there can be no doubt in having in one case covered a bin full of oats with a layer of wheat and mortgaged it for all wheat; in another taking out an insurance policy on 600 bushels of wheat which he had already sold, doing it for the purpose of hoodwinking the mortgagees, besides mortgaging property which he either did not own or had already disposed of, and, as has heretofore been stated selling mortgaged property, and he could be sent to the penitentiary, if found, on at least four or five different counts.

Jamestown Alert, 1/19/1883
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A skunk broke up school at Lidgerwood till the janitor got the building fumigated.

Williston Graphic, 11/19/1903
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Beach—Kastien's machine shop was the scene of a terrible accident caused by the explosion of a large oil tank, which resulted in the death of William Gillmore, a machinist. The explosion, the report of which was heard for miles around, was so great that it mangled its victim and wrecked the entire building.

Turtle Mountain Star, 2/18/1909
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DIED WHILE ON WAY HOME

Miss Pauline Pfund Succumbed to Ravages of White Plague—Was on Way to Ada, Minn.

The remains of the late Miss Pauline Pfund, who died at one of the local hospitals on Sunday evening, will be taken to her home in Ada, Minn., this evening. The deceased, aged 39 years, had been living on a claim near Dutton, Mont., for the past three years, where she had gone in the hopes that a change of climate and conditions would lead to her recovery from tuberculosis.

She was taken seriously ill a short time ago and her brother and sister went to her home and were taken {sp} her to Ada, Minn. They brought her as far as Grand Forks and were compelled to change cars here. While waiting for the train, the victim of the white plague was taken violently ill and was removed to the hospital. Her sister, Mrs. C. R. Ahlers, and her cousin, Louis Pfund, arrived in the city today and took charge of the remains.

Grand Forks Evening Times, 12/19/1911
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Little Mamie Foley, the pet of the Grand Central hotel, met with a severe accident night before last by being badly scalded. The porter was coming out of the kitchen door with a cup of hot water when, seeing the door opening, the child rushed in running against the porter by which the hot water was emptied upon her head scalding her to a blister in several places from which she has suffered intensely ever since.

Jamestown Alert, 1/19/1883
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Fargo—The fourteenth child was born on New Year day to Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Hofman, 36 and 35 respectively. Ten of the children are living. Mr. Hoffman is a traveling salesman.

Turtle Mountain Star, 1/19/1922
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