A poker game at Harwood was the occasion of Chris Shulky receiving a shot in the face last week.

Williston Graphic, 11/19/1903
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Little boy's Close Call.

Birch Reed, a Minot drayman, came within an ace of killing a little boy at the rear of the New York Store Friday morning. Mr. Reed was backing against the platform with a loaded wagon, when a little boy attempted to run between the wagon and the platform. Mr. Reed did not see him and the lad, seeing that he could not pass the wagon before it was upon him, turned and attempted to run back. A bolt on the wagon caught his forehead and forced his head close to the platform, inflicting a painful wound. Had not Mr. Reed whipped up his horses, the lad would have had his brains crushed out. The little boy fell to the ground almost senseless, but got up and ran away crying before Mr. Reed could ascertain his name.

Ward County Independent, 11/11/1903
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F. R. Kelly is dead at Enderlin as the result of a 22 calibre bullet accidentally penetrating his right eye and lodging in the brain. He was in the act of shooting a weasel, and not having the weapon in position to shoot when the weasel appeared struck at it with the butt of the gun, with the result above given.

He died in five minutes. He was a painter and decorator and had worked in several towns of the state, being employed by the Chicago Painting and Decorating Company. He was a married man, but was not living with his wife.

Hankinson News, 8/2/1906
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BURNED IN GAS EXPLOSION

Bisbee, N.D., Feb 6.—John Brennan and son, Fretta, were painfully burned by an explosion of a gasoline can, which threw burning fluid over their boddies {sp}. The explosion occurred when the boy used a torch to heat a gasoline engine.

Williston Graphic, 2/7/1918
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SWINDLER.

A Smooth Man Swindles Farmers as Live Stock Inspector.

Huron, S.D., Nov 16.—A number of farmers in the central portion of the state are the victims of a smooth swindler. A pleasant-appearing individual calls at the farm and introduces himself as an inspector of live stock.

The introduction is such that the farmer concludes that the man is a representative of the government, and allows him to inspect his herd. After the inspection a bill anywhere from $2.50 to $10 is presented, which the farmer pays and takes the inspection certificates.

In time he discovers that the inspector has no authority from the government or any one else to make the inspection, and realizes that he has been swindled.

Williston Graphic, 11/19/1908
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Editor De la Berre of the Sheldon Progress is puzzling himself about a well for the strange actions of which he cannot account and wants to know why it acts that way: "On Jacob Shelyer's farm on Section 34 in Liberty there is a well which when the wind is in the north gives a good supply of water and when the wind is in the south goes partly or entirely dry. Carrier Wychoff stops here daily to water his horse and vouches for it that for a time this summer after a south wind has prevailed the well was dry. He had to water elsewhere and Mr. Shelyer was obliged to haul water for his own stock. Why should the direction of the wind affect the supply of water in a well?"

Ward County Independent, 11/11/1903
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Suicide on the Soo.

An unknown male passenger on Soo train 108 committed suicide by shooting himself through the head just before the train reached Valley City on Thursday of last week. He stood on the coach steps and evidently planned to fall forward after the fatal shot was fired, but a lurch of the train threw him back on the steps and he died a few moments later. From papers on the body it was at first supposed the unfortunate was Fred Stiggle of Considine, N.D., but it developed later that Stiggle was at his home alive and well.

The man was ticketed from some point in Canada but so far all efforts to establish his identity have been unavailing. The authorities have had the body embalmed and it will be kept for two weeks if necessary to secure identification.

Hankinson News, 8/16/1906
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NELS LUNDELL HURT


Horse Falls on Him and Badly Crushed Him

Bels Lundell of the Garden Valley neighborhood was badly hurt Sunday when a horse slipped and fell rolling over him, badly crushing his body and the saddle crushing his head, producing concussion of the brain. Henry Helgeson and Paul Field took the wounded man to E. O. Eckberg's where medical attention was summoned and at present he is expected to recover.

Williston Graphic, 11/2/1911
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The north end of the town witnessed quite an exciting runaway on Monday last. Mrs. C. E. Jackson and her little daughter were out driving when the horse took fright and dashed away at a furious speed. The occupants of the cutter were thrown out, but not seriously injured, we are glad to say. The cutter, a shining new one, came out in bad shape.

Pembina Pioneer Express, 12/7/1883
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