Buttzville—A man named Plum, living one and one-half miles west of here, attempted suicide by taking strychnine. He has a fine farm, good crop prospects, a wife and six children and is only 36 years old. He gave as his reason that he was tired of living, and refused to take antidotes from the doctor. He died the next day.

Williston Graphic, 7/26/1906
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The farm residence of Henry Shaver about three miles northwest of Rolla just across the Mount Pleasant township line was burned to the ground last evening with all of its contents. The fire was discovered upstairs about supper time. It had then made such progress that nothing could be done to save the building and only a very few things could be removed. The house was occupied by E. D. Giles and family, who had charge of the farm. It was well built and plastered throughout, contained five rooms, was valued at $1200 and carried $800 insurance. The contents were valued at $500. Besides the furniture there were a cream separator worth $125, and a new shot gun worth $38. Some of the furniture was owned by Mrs. Shaver and some by Mrs. Giles. Among the articles lost were a box of books and a large collection of family photographs, the property of Mr. and Mrs. Shaver. Mr. and Mrs. Giles had just purchased a new piano, which was taken as far as the door when the roof fell in.

Turtle Mountain Star, 10/5/1911
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PULMOTOR SAVES GIRL

Moorhead, Minn., Oct. 3.—The life of Martha Sandless, 12 years old, of LaMoure, N.D., was saved by the use of a pulmotor. The girl had a bad case of appendecitis{sp}, and after an operation a clot of blood formed on the lungs and her condition became critical. She stopped breathing several times and Dr. O.J. Hagen sent for the electric light company's pulmotor. When the device was put in operation the patient responded almost immediately and is doing splendidly, and only complications from the operation are to be feared.

Bismarck Tribune, 10/4/1913
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ABERCROMBIE, Aug. 16.—A tornado of great fury struck this place last evening, at 6:40, coming from the north and northwest. The storm was accompanied by rain, which came in torrents, and was lashed into foam as it struck the ground. The first damage done was the unroofing of the blacksmith shop, located in the northwestern part of the village.

THE MOST SERIOUS DAMAGE DONE

is the complete destruction of the new Congregational church,{and the} Fargo Southern depot. This building is nothing but a mass of kindling wood, and parts of it are scattered as far as McCauleyville, one mile east. W. M. Hobson, proprietor of the restaurant, sought refuge in the church and came near losing his life by its collapse. His escape is miraculous. Julius Hallum, in attempting to cross the street to his store with his baby in his arms, was lifted off his feet and the baby carried some twenty feet and let down without a scratch. Eye witnesses say that the air was filled with boards, bricks and bundles of wheat. The whole heavens were a solid mass of yellow.

Jamestown Weekly Alert, 8/19/1886
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Robs Passengers; Steals Auto.

Fargo, Sept. 20.—After killing Harry Carter, a negro, as the result of a quarrel over a card game, a white man, whose identity is unknown, is alleged to have held up an automobile party at the point of a revolver near Hope, N.D., and escaped in their car. A sheriff's posse is in pursuit.

Turtle Mountain Star, 9/25/1913


NEGRO'S SHOOTER HELD

Hope, N.D., Oct. 3.—Charles Cain, charged with shooting Harry Carter, colored, was bound over to the district court under $10,000 bond, being charged with attempt to kill.

Bismarck Tribune, 10/4/1913

Editor note: "killed" in the first article vs "attempt to kill" in the second may be confusion over whether 'shot' means a result of death, a common newspaper mistake.
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YEGGS CRACK SAFE IN GLARE OF LIGHT

Grand Forks, N.D., Oct. 3.—One hundred and fifty dollars in currency and $400 in checks was obtained by robbers in a raid on the Grand Forks Ice company's office here early today. Failure of the cashier to properly lock the safe made work easy, although the office is located in the heart of the business district with the safe in the glare of the arc lights and readily visible from the streets. In taking the checks the burglars left several that were questionable.

Bismarck Tribune, 10/4/1913
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Manning had a series of accidents last week in which Mike Cullsky was struck on the head with a ball bat, Frank Johnson was struck in the eye with a ball while witnessing a game and Fred Hammell was kicked in the ribs by a horse. Affixed to the other tragedies while Crosby Fox was hitching a colt the animal planted one foot in his mouth and Miss Bernice Deming lost her life in a runaway.

Valley City Times-Record, 8/7/1913
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A horrible accident occurred last week near Comstock, the other side of Wahpeton. The little two year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. N. Roen was playing on a hayrack and in some way fell between the boards and was caught by the head and strangled to death.

Hankinson News, 7/27/1905
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Mr. James Taylor, manager of the St. Anthony and Dakota Elevator Co's. house in this city, sustained a very painful accident while at work Monday morning last. Mr. Taylor was compelled to inspect a part of the machinery, and while doing so, the ladder on which he was standing suddenly slipped from under him, and he was thrown to the floor, with sufficient force to break his wrist. Dr. Harris was summoned to reduce the fracture and we hope for a speedy recovery.

Turtle Mountain Star, 9/25/1913
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