Vivian, the 3-year-old daughter of Rev. and Mrs. C. O. Gulleor of Souris, met with a peculiar accident recently, getting a button in her nose. It became lodged so firmly that a physician was called, and an anaesthetic had to be administered before the offending object could be removed. She is none the worse for the experience.

Bowbells Tribune, 10/16/1914
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While hauling manure away from his barn in Drayton, James Robinson dug up a kit of burglars tools, several drills and other suspicious things.

Bismarck Tribune, 11/3/1893
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DRAWS FOUR ACES AND GOES INSANE.

Bottineau, N. D., Nov. 1.—Four aces dealt him in a poker game at Minot, when he was the victim of a trio of sharps, are believed responsible for the insanity of John A. Hahn, jailed today when his condition became violent. He was taken to Jamestown.

When Hahn received the four-ace hand he bet his pile, $19, and lost to a royal flush.

Jamestown Weekly Alert, 11/6/1913
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SHERWOOD LINE HAS OBLIGING CONDUCTOR

HIS TRAIN IS FLAGGED BY WOMAN WHO WANTED SOME NIPPLES FOR BABY.

Minot, N. D., Oct. 2.—Conductor R. C. Wynn of the "Sunshine Limited", the Sherwood flyer, on the Great Northern, is an obliging man. In fact he has made a hit with the people up and down the line for his willingness to make purchases for them during his stay in Minot. But he felt that his nature was being imposed upon this morning when a woman flagged the train at Mohall, N. D., and asked him to purchase two anti-colic nipples for her baby.

Mr. Wynn, incensed that she had stopped his train, at first turned a deaf ear to her pleas, but when she insisted that her baby's life depended on the nipples he finally consented to make the purchase in Minot. On his arrival in Minot, the kind-hearted conductor went from store to store in quest of the nipples, finally getting what he desired. He was at the depot this afternoon and, missing the nipples he started to look for them. Mr. Wynn was abashed, for the nipples rolled to the feet of a number of ladies. One of them picked the nipples up and restored them to Wynn, who felt it necessary to explain that he did not need them for himself, as he was already a grandfather.

Conductor Wynn is getting round shouldered carrying bundles from Minot to the folks along the line. Lately he has been almost overburdened. Among some of the things he had to take to a party along the line yesterday was a consignment of dried herring. Mr. Wynn averages at least 25 parcels every day and makes trips to the five and ten cent store daily, the Fair Store and a number of Minot business estabilshments to secure wares for his friends.

Bowbells Tribune, 10/3/1913
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Where They Were When The Armistice Was Signed

November 11, 1918, was one of the biggest days in the world's history, and it was the biggest day in the lives of many men and women. It was a very, very big day to many Grand Forks men, who were in France at the time. They were in various places and they did various things, when they got the news that the armistice had been signed. But they all celebrated, and it seems to have ben {sp} some celebration. Here is what a few local men say about the day:

Captain L. L. Eckman: "I was at Gondrecourt, where I was an instructor in the First Division Gun school when the armistice was signed. There was some celebration that night. I took a prominent part in the celebration that was held at the Y.M.C.A."

Maurice Ryan: "I don't remember the name of the town I was in the night the armistice was signed, but I know it was a mighty good town, and there were no American M.P.'s there."

F. F. Ross: "I was at St. Nazaire when the armistice was signed. Never mind what we did. It was plenty."

Dr. A. C. Dean: "I was on the U.S.S. Mercy, a short distance off the east coast of this country when the news that armistice had been signed was flashed to us by wireless. Our ship immediately steamed toward Philadelphia. We reached the city about 5 o'clock in the afternoon of November 11. The celebration in that city was at its highest when we arrived ashore and it was some celebration."

Sergeant Mose Rosenzweig: "When I heard that the armistice had been signed I was driving General Cole to Paris. Upon hearing the news the general ordered me to 'step on her' which I did and we soon reached Paris. It was given the remainder of the day off, and—that's all."

Harry Scouten: "On November 7, 1918, when the report came that the armistice was signed I was aboard the 'Empress of Asia,' bound for New York. We had quite a celebration on the ship but our joy was killed in short order when a wireless informed us that the report was a fake. We arrived in New York on the night of the 10th and when the confirmed report came in that the armistice had been signed—well New York went wild and I guess that I went with her."

W. G. Stevens: "I was just outside Metz with the 35th division waiting for the morning of the 13th to come. We were to go over the top on that morning, but the signing of the armistice cancelled all obligations along that line. Needless to say we had some little celebration."

Sam Ardies: "I was in Bordeaux with Evacuation Hospital No. 33. We were loaded and ready to move to Verdun, when the news of the armistice came. We loaded again."

Joe Brown: "Issodun was some place to be on November 11, 1918. I was with Camp Hospital 59, and when the news came the outfit was 'at ease.'

C. E. Zink stated: "I was with the 20th engineers at Chenonceaux, France, when the Armistice was signed. Out {sp} battalion was engaged in cutting timber for the construction of hospitals and roads and were not granted the day thereby missing the big celebration."

Sam Garber, a veteran of many battles said: "When the Armistice was signed I was in the hospital at Vichy, France, convalescing as the result of nine shrapnel wounds. Although badly crippled, I managed to make the cafe across the street from the hospital with the aid of crutches. Several of the other men, who were confined to the hospital, made the cafe in wheel-chairs while some were carried over on stretchers. Despite the disabled condition of the gang we had quite a celebration."

LeRoy W. Goodwater said: "When the Armistice was signed I was attending the officers' training school at Langres, France. The school closed for the day and the 5,000 of us attending invaded the fillage. We had some time."

Grand Forks Herald, 11/11/1920
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Mrs. Steve Allen and niece Miss Clara Snare are recovering nicedly from injuries received Saturday in a runaway accident on Fifth avenue. The horses became frightened at an auto, tipping the ladies out. Mrs. Allen received a bad cut on the forehead over the left eye, and was somewhat bruised, and Miss Snare suffered a sprained ankle. They were taken to Dr. DePuy's office where the injuries were cared for.

Jamestown Weekly Alert, 11/6/1913
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While toying with a revolver, Floyd Way of Marmarth accidentally shot himself in the side of the head. The bullet fortunately glanced.

Bowbells Tribune, 10/16/1914
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YOUTH STEALS, GIRL SAVES, FOR MARRIAGE.

Wahpeton, N. D., Oct. 2.—Leland Rambharter, 19 years old, of Clear Lake, S. D., impatient in his quest for funds with which to elope with his sweetheart, stole $30 from his roommate, Willie Pohl, at Hankinson, this county. When taken before Judge Dow in this city, he pleaded guilty and said that when arrested at the home of his sweetheart in Minot, he had just learned that the girl who had agreed to run away to marry him, had saved $100 of her meager earnings with which to finance the venture.

Bowbells Tribune, 10/3/1913
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Joe Fox, the heaviest man in town at present, tipped the beam at 258 pounds Thursday and is still growing.

Bismarck Tribune, 11/7/1890
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