Autos in the south end of the county, according to the Calio News have frequently found it necessary to add an additional two horse power to their driving capacity in order to surmount the obstacle of the heavy fall of snow within the past couple of weeks. The extra two horse power, however, requires oats as fuel instead of gasoline.

Langdon Courier Democrat, 1/2/1919
Permalink

Not withstanding the fact that cuspidors are provided in the waiting room of the depot, some human hogs make a practice of spitting tobacco juice profusely about the floors, and last night one hog, more hoggish than his fellows, went into the ladies waiting room and spat upon the rug. Some rigorous prosecutions of the persons who have no appreciation of a handsome building except as a place to carry out their filthy practices would be an excellent tonic for decency.

Bismarck Tribune, 12/20/1901
Permalink

C. H. Grinacher, an east side clerk, has been arrested in Grand Forks, for impersonating an officer. On one occasion, he represented himself as a sheriff, took a cow from a widow, claiming to do it under execution, sold it and pocketed the money.

Bismarck Tribune, 11/3/1893
Permalink

Swiped a Trunk.

Theodore Ness, the man who came down off the branch line and appropriated a trunk belonging to a lady who also came down on the same train, has had his hearing and after serving twenty-five days in jail, paying the cost of his arrest and hearing, and making settlement with the lady, he probably will be glad to go to his claim and enjoy the freedom of an American citizen. Mrs. Thresa Estervaag, the owner of the trunk, lives here, and when she boarded the train at a blind siding up the road, she was unable to get a check for her trunk, so Mr. Ness, being a rather foxy individual, proceeded to have her trunk crecked {sp} to Williston, and took it out to his claim, where he was enjoying the use of bedclothes found inside after he had sawed off the lock. Sheriff Ely had a thirty mile ride in order to find his man and after he had arrived at Williston, but he very calmly admitted that the trunk in question, was the one he had appropriated, and accompanied Mr. Ely back to Rugby. He will be taken to Devils Lake to serve his time.—Rugby Tribune.

Ward County Independent, 1/16/1908
Permalink


Permalink

A sensation has been created at Harold{sp} by a land agent named Bell assaulting Frank Haddock, who was with his aunt seeking a retraction from Bell of alleged slanderous statements of the latter regarding Miss Haddock, sister of Frank. Bell is charged with boasting of favors received from Miss Haddock, and with having given further semblance of truth to his boasts by having dressed in woman's garb, and in that guise entered his own office at night, causing people to believe that Miss Haddock was his visitor. Bell claims it is a case of blackmail.

Cooperstown Courier, 1/4/1884
Permalink

Three Injured in Explosion.

While one of the miners in the Pioneer coal mine near Williston was trying to dry some blasting powder there was an explosion and three men almost lost their lives. One had one of his arms burned off and the flesh on his face badly burned. The others were also badly burned but are expected to recover.

Langdon Courier Democrat, 11/24/1904
Permalink

ESCAPED CONVICT KILLS 3


Ends Own Life After Leaving Notes, Saying He Was a Prisoner and Insane.

Williston, No. Dak.—Mrs. A. M. Hart, wife of a farmer, and her two sons, aged 9 and 13, were beaten to death with an iron bar in the hands of Guy Hall, a former convict.

Hall afterwards committed suicide by shooting himself with a revolver.

The crime was discovered when the slayer took Mrs. Hart's two daughters to a neighbor's house after keeping them in the room with their murdered mother all night.

It was then that Hall ended his own life.

The murderer left two notes, one saying that he was an escaped prisoner of the Washington state reformatory. The other said: "Please forgive me for I am insane."

Sioux County Pioneer, 1/7/1916
Permalink

Velva—a 400-pound chunk of coal crushed Ankor Larson to death in the local coal mine.

Cavalier County Farmers Press, 12/2/1920
Permalink

Blaze on New Year's Eve

Early on New Year's Eve a fire alarm was turned in about eight o'clock from the residence of Manager Miller of the Cavalier Co. Lumber Co., where the explosion of a gasoline stove left the kitchin {sp} badly scorched and much in evidence of what had happened. A second call phoned in notified the department that the fire had been put out and that its services would not be needed. As the home is up on the hill in the Dorval addition the boys were saved a long cold run through the snow from the fire hall to the Miller home. There were some, however, who would have liked to have seen the power from the new water works plant in action and put to the test.

Langdon Courier Democrat, 1/2/1919
Permalink