Robert McConnell of Cavalier was found lying in the railroad ditch near his farm week ago Tuesday. Mr McConnell was engaged in fixing a ditch to keep water from overflowing from the railway ditch on his farm. He was subject to epilepsy. There was about two feet of water in the ditch and he was lying on his face. He was working alone and was discovered by the hired man who was made anxious by his long absence. He was dead when found. Mr. McConnell was for many years a resident of the Bruce neighborhood and settled there in 1880. He moved to Cavalier about twelve years ago. He was well-to-do. He was a member of the M. E. church and was highly respected. Alex. and William McConnell and Mrs. E. Renwick of Bruce, Thos. G. McConnell, J. A. McGonnell {sp}, and Mas. C. E. Backer of Cavalier, Mrs. E. Schluchter of Backoo, are children left to mourn with the widow.

Pembina Pioneer Express, 6/7/1912
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David Blackey, a well known mining man of Garnet, Mont., has been killed as the result of a somewhat singular accident. He had just purchased a horse and was riding it for the first time when a dog dashed into the roadway and snapped at the animal's heels, causing it to become unmanageable. Blackey was thrown violently to the ground and died soon afterward.

Wahpeton Times, 6/6/1907
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Under the new marriage law that goes into effect on July 1st. every man and woman must first procure a certificate from a physician before they can get a license to marry. This is to prevent the marriage of persons afflicted with insanity, tuberculosis, epilepsy and similar hereditary diseases as well as contagious maladies. Women over forty-five, or men who are marrying women over that age are exempt from this rule.

Pembina Pioneer Express, 5/30/1913
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Jake Kunc of Starkweather took a big swig of formaldahyde by mistake and killed off all the germs in his system.

Golden Valley Chronicle, 5/29/1908
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Mrs. Henry A. Oleson of near Alpha died suddenly at 11:20 this morning at the hospital from convulsions attending childbirth. The baby, a healthy girl, was saved and bid fair to do well.

Golden Valley Chronicle, 6/10/1910
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MAN CRUSHED BY ENGINE


Stranger Whose Name is Unknown Killed by Switch Engine in Mandan.

A man whose name could not be learned was run down and killed by a switch engine in Mandan last night. The man had been riding on the tender of No. 1, with a companion. He was ordered off by the engineer, as the train was changing engines, and stepped directly in front of the switch engine on the next track. He was killed instantly, the body being badly crushed. His companion, when he saw what had happened, jumped down from the other side of No. 1's tender, and ran away.

The man who was killed was fairly well dressed, but no mark of identification could be found on him. He had some money and carried a large revolver. The body was taken at once to the Kennelly Undertaking Parlors, where it is being held for identification. It is thought that possibly the men were planning a hold-up of the train, and that the man's companion feared arrest for that reason.

Bismarck Tribune, 7/14/1914
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Some unscrupulous person shot Andrew Nelson's cow with a 22 rifle the other afternoon and the animal may die. The promiscious {sp} firing with these small rifles is altogether too common for the safety of persons aud {sp} animals. Mr. Nelson serves notice that the carrying of firearms around his premises is strictly prohibited from now on. Any one found on the premises with a gun will be prosecuted and the firearm confiscated. Take notice boys.

Pembina Pioneer Express, 6/7/1912
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DIED.

BERRY.—At Fargo. D. T., June 4th, a.m. 1879, Hiram E. Berry, of Mechanic's Falls, Maine, of an electric shock. Age, about 24 years.

Last week, during a severe thunder storm, Hiram E. Berry had been operating at a cutout in the tank house, at Lake Eckelson; he had just pulled the plug, and was standing near the cutout, when the lightning struck the wire, ran in the house and knocked him down on the floor. He did not feel the effects of the shock very bad after the first few moments, and was able to come here; but after his arrival complained of diziness {sp}, and numbness of his limbs, but kept up and did some operating until compelled to take to his bed.

On Saturday Mr. Harris sent him to Fargo, so that he could have proper medical attendance. Monday noon he was reported somewhat better, but alas it was only temporary; and Wednesday morning he breathed his last. He had a shock once before at Bismarck.

Mr. Berry's father is an agent at Mechanic's Falls, Maine, on the Grand Trunk Railroad and has been in the employ of that road for over 20 years.

Hiram was a pleasant young man, and was thought a great deal of by Mr. Harris and others that knew him. His last words here to a friend after he was carried on the train, were: "Thank the boys for their kindness to me." It will be a severe shock to his parents when they hear of his demis; {sp} and they have our sympathies as well as the people of Jamestown.

Jamestown Alert, 6/5/1879
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At Ray some young people masqueraded as Indians and negroes and frightened some of the residents.

Golden Valley Chronicle, 5/29/1908
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